Flu Vaccine is the Best Protection Against Flu

Getting a flu vaccine is the first and most important step in protecting against flu.

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Symptoms and Treatment

If you get sick with flu symptoms call your doctor right away. There are antiviral drugs that can treat flu illness and prevent serious flu complications. CDC recommends prompt treatment for people who have influenza infection or suspected influenza infection and who are at high risk of serious flu complications, such as people with asthma, diabetes (including gestational diabetes), or heart disease. Early treatment of influenza in hospitalized pregnant women has been shown to reduce the length of the hospital stay.

Symptoms

Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may also have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu and have respiratory symptoms without a fever.

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SOURCE:  https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/pregnant.htm?s_cid=PN-NCIRD-OY2-Maternal-AW-FluPreg-1

understanding stroke

PREVENTION IS THE BEST CURE FOR STROKE

Source: Capital Cardiology Associates website

When blood flow to a part of your brain is stopped, you can have a stroke. Without oxygen and nutrients from the blood, brain cells die quickly. A stroke can damage your brain. It can even kill you. According to The National Stroke Association, stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S.

What happens

Director of Clinical Research, Dr. Robert Benton explains how a stroke event is similar to a heart attack. “Essentially for both of them you have an instance where you’re losing blood flow to a part of the brain or the heart. That is the common finding in both of them. In the heart, usually, this is caused by a cholesterol plaque that has become inflamed, ruptures because you are smoking, or because you have high blood pressure, and there’s a blood clot that forms and blocks blood flow to the heart. When the heart muscle doesn’t get blood, it dies. The brain is similar in that you can have plaque in your brain but the brain is also susceptible to other findings, that would be emboli that fly either from your neck, clotting breaking off from the arteries or the aorta, or one of the common causes of stroke called, atrial fibrillation (AFib).”

The average person with atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is 5 times more likely to suffer a stroke than someone with a regular heartbeat. To learn more about the basics of Afib, start here. People with untreated atrial fibrillation may be at greater risk for stroke than people with normal heart rhythms. Because blood does not flow through the atria regularly, blood clots may form in the heart. If a blood clot escapes from the heart, it can travel through the bloodstream to the brain and cause a stroke.

There are two main kinds of stroke

One is called an ischemic stroke. This can happen when a sticky, fatty material called “plaque” builds up in a blood vessel in your brain. Plaque slows your blood flow. It may cause your blood to clot. This can stop the flow of blood completely. This kind of stroke can also happen when a clot travels to your brain from another part of your body, even if you don’t have plaque in your vessels.

The other kind of stroke is called a hemorrhagic stroke. It happens when a blood vessel leaks into your brain, or into the space around your brain. Hemorrhagic strokes are less common, in fact only 15 percent of all strokes are hemorrhagic, but they are responsible for about 40 percent of all stroke deaths. Click here to continue reading

Information provided on this website is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice and is not intended to replace the services of a physician, nor does it constitute a doctor-patient relationship. You should not use information on this website or the information on linked from this site, or the content on the website (or any part thereof), to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare provider If you have or suspect you have an urgent medical problem, promptly contact a professional healthcare provider. CCA advises you to always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider proper to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Any application of the recommendations in this website is at the reader’s discretion.

Tick Prevention

Source: NYSDOH

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